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Big dog primary gasket


Big dog primary gasket set

I have a 2000 Chevy K5 Blazer that I just purchased. It's a 2.5 L engine with a single quad 1 1/2" exhaust with a TSP. It came off a truck and is all original. I want to go with a 2 1/2" exhaust but I need to be sure that there's plenty of primary gasket area to go around. I have done some measuring and there appears to be more than enough to be sure of an adequate seal. The last owner installed some kind of a tube and I know there was a previous owner that had the engine rebuilt with a single exhaust. Any ideas?

I just purchased a 2002 K5 Blazer that I'm converting to single quad exhaust. Before I do the conversion I want to make sure the primary gaskets will be sufficient for my project. I have a 2 1/2" exhaust system that will go to 1 1/2" TSP's. I'm using the original exhaust manifolds. Will my primary gasket seal suffice or will it be better to get new gaskets?

My primary is gasket for my K5. This is the way I know that I've got a good seal. I have no complnts with the gasket at all. My primary is a 4" diameter x.500" thick, high temp steel. This primary is on the engine block. If I had to compare it to other, more common gaskets, it would be considered a 2 1/2" or 3 1/2" in diameter.

My primary is gasket for my K5. This is the way I know that I've got a good seal. I have no complnts with the gasket at all. My primary is a 4" diameter x.500" thick, high temp steel. This primary is on the engine block. If I had to compare it to other, more common gaskets, it would be considered a 2 1/2" or 3 1/2" in diameter.

This seems to be a good starting point for making your decisions. How about a 2 1/2" X 1/2" or 3 1/2" x 1/2" high temp steel or better yet a 2 1/2" x 3/8" cast iron.

Ok so my question is this. If my primary gasket has no problems with the seal at all, can I be reasonably sure that the other side of the primary would have no problems? Would this be a bad thing?

The short answer is yes. When you are doing a gasket project you want to have a backup. One reason for this is that if you have a problem you can't really fix you will be wasting your money on a fled project and you will waste a lot of time. If you aren't happy with the primary you can then use the backup to install it.

Ok so my question is this. If my primary gasket has no problems with the seal at all, can I be reasonably sure that the other side of the primary would have no problems? Would this be a bad thing?

I would say it is reasonable. The primary gasket needs to be adequate. You don't want to waste your money on a project that doesn't do the job.

Ok so my question is this. If my primary gasket has no problems with the seal at all, can I be reasonably sure that the other side of the primary would have no problems? Would this be a bad thing?

The short answer is yes. When you are doing a gasket project you want to have a backup. One reason for this is that if you have a problem you can't really fix you will be wasting your money on a fled project and you will waste a lot of time. If you aren't happy with the primary you can then use the backup to install it.

Ok so my question is this. If my primary gasket has no problems with the seal at all, can I be reasonably sure that the other side of the primary would have no problems? Would this be a bad thing?

I would say it is reasonable. The primary gasket needs to be adequate. You don't want to waste your money on a project that doesn't do the job.

Thanks

It's actually a 2 1/2" primary, so that's kind of a relief. I have 3 1/2" x 1/2" and a 4" x.500". I'm going to try the 3 1/2" for now and use the 2 1/2" if the 3 1/2" isn't sufficient.

Ok so my question is this. If my primary gasket has no problems with the seal at all, can I be reasonably sure that the other side of the primary would have no problems? Would this be a bad thing?

The short answer is yes. When you are doing a gasket project you want to have a backup. One reason for this is that if you have a problem you can't really fix you will be wasting your money on a fled project and you will waste a lot of time. If you aren't happy with the primary you can then use the backup to install it.

Ok so my question is this. If my primary gasket has no problems with the seal at all, can I be reasonably sure that the other side of the primary would have no problems? Would this be a bad thing?

I would say it is reasonable. The primary gasket needs to be adequate. You don't want to waste your money on a project that doesn't do the job.

Thanks

It's actually a 2 1/2" primary, so that's kind of a relief. I have 3 1/2" x 1/2" and a 4" x.500". I'm going to try the 3 1/2" for now and use the 2 1/2" if the 3 1/2" isn't sufficient.

Your primary is still a good primary. It will be a backup at some point. You will probably use it to install your new primary when you do the exhaust


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