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Can dogs eat all purpose flour


Can dogs eat all purpose flour or is it better to buy a low carb dog food?

I've noticed a lot of dog food is made up of what seems like just bread. This makes me worried because bread is a carb and my dog loves it and it seems as though it's making him sick. He's a 13 month old, 120 lb, 40-50 lb female dog.

This is what she's eating (she has been eating this for a while now):

A few days ago I found out about a dog food with only 1 carb per serving. I want to feed this but it's expensive so I'm worried that she will reject it. I think there are a few posts on here talking about dogs eating only grn but is it really a bad idea to give them all purpose flour?

I've noticed a lot of dog food is made up of what seems like just bread. This makes me worried because bread is a carb and my dog loves it and it seems as though it's making him sick. He's a 13 month old, 120 lb, 40-50 lb female dog.

This is what she's eating (she has been eating this for a while now):

A few days ago I found out about a dog food with only 1 carb per serving. I want to feed this but it's expensive so I'm worried that she will reject it. I think there are a few posts on here talking about dogs eating only grn but is it really a bad idea to give them all purpose flour?

A:

It sounds like you have a well balanced diet already and the problem is her stomach is not used to the higher carb diet. My first recommendation is to switch her to a higher carb food like Chicken and Rice, the more you feed her, the better your chances of success. I would start out with half of the new food and increase her intake over time. As long as you aren't giving her too much, you won't have to worry about her rejecting it, and it's very inexpensive. You should not have any problems.

A:

Bread is a carbohydrate source so yes, it would be considered a carb.

I don't know what her current diet is and why she's rejecting it, but switching to a higher carb diet will definitely help.

It can be used for mntenance of a higher carb diet. If you are already giving her the high-carb dry food, simply switch her to canned (since it doesn't need to be soaked, it won't dilute the nutritional value in the same way) and switch her back to the higher carb food as you increase her intake.

I'm not familiar with the brand you mentioned, but it may be cheaper to just find a brand similar to what you have now (e.g. Chicken and Rice) and switch her over. Or at least switch over for a week, then evaluate.

It might also be worth getting her to the vet to make sure everything's okay. A diet change could easily change a normal problem into something more severe (e.g. food poisoning from a moldy ingredient).

If she has been eating it for awhile and it's just a new food that's different, I'd suggest switching over for a week and then increasing her intake. The longer she goes without the change, the more the transition will be an adjustment.

You will find that a high-carb diet is more expensive than a lower-carb diet. That's why people recommend switching to a higher-carb diet, so you can afford it.

As far as your particular dog eating it, she might be more willing to try it if she doesn't have to make any changes. She might also be more willing to try a new food if you add a little of the current food into the new food when you first mix it up. I know we get this reaction from some dogs when they try a new food. If she does, you can add some of the current food into the new to help get her used to it.

It is recommended that you give a dog a serving of food once per day to mntn healthy weight and proper weight distribution. As long as the serving is at least 3/4 cup of the food per serving, this should not present any problem.

A:

I agree with everyone saying it is worth seeing a vet, but there is another option that may be worth checking out first. It can be hard to find in the USA, so maybe you can get a better idea of what you can get in Europe. You can order a liquid ketone supplement from one of the major suppliers. This will work in place of the blood ketones that can develop in a ketogenic diet for some people, and it is a more mild version. Some of the side effects are less than a blood ketone, and it doesn't increase your body's insulin resistance like a true ketogenic diet. It will also help with the cost of the diet. If you're already giving her grn then adding the liquid can help transition her to the new diet. If you can find it, it's a little expensive, but I think it's worth a shot.

It's hard to say exactly what the long-term effects of switching to a ketogenic diet for dogs will be, as we don't know what's best for the liver for dogs. A lot of dogs eat this diet for weight loss in humans, which makes it worth trying for the short-term, but that's not something I would recommend as a long-term option. A ketogenic diet for dogs may also have negative side effects, but agn we don't know enough to know what they will be. Some of them may just be the side-effects that come with transitioning to any new diet. I recommend getting a vet involved and doing this under supervision if at all possible.

Good luck!


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