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Dogs detecting drugs ielts reading answers


Dogs detecting drugs ielts reading answers

The dog sniff-out program is designed to help officers and agents determine if something illegal is in the person's car or luggage. For instance, a dog might detect that you are transporting narcotics and give off a telltale smell. If there are drugs in your luggage, the law would let officers search it.

The dog sniff-out program is designed to help officers and agents determine if something illegal is in the person's car or luggage. For instance, a dog might detect that you are transporting narcotics and give off a telltale smell. If there are drugs in your luggage, the law would let officers search it. (Tribune photo by Mike DeGree)

The dog sniff-out program is designed to help officers and agents determine if something illegal is in the person's car or luggage. For instance, a dog might detect that you are transporting narcotics and give off a telltale smell. If there are drugs in your luggage, the law would let officers search it.

The dog sniff-out program is designed to help officers and agents determine if something illegal is in the person's car or luggage. For instance, a dog might detect that you are transporting narcotics and give off a telltale smell. If there are drugs in your luggage, the law would let officers search it. (Tribune photo by Mike DeGree)

By:

Tom Hocker, Tribune Newspapers

December 27, 2009

Chicago

It's a simple question. A question that seems easy for most people, except for a handful of law enforcement officials working behind the scenes to detect illegal drugs or weapons. The question: "Are you carrying drugs or weapons?"

Most people would probably say, "No," when asked that question. If someone is pulled over, the normal reaction is to slow down and show police credentials.

However, for law enforcement officials, a negative answer to that simple question is often an admission of guilt.

"If a drug dog gives off an alert, it is considered a drug offense and the person could be searched," sd Jimmie Vinson, a Chicago-based former federal DEA agent who was with the Los Angeles Police Department. "It is important to keep in mind that a positive alert is not evidence of a crime. It is one piece of evidence, just like fingerprints, handwriting or voice identification.

"It is one more tool police can use. They are using more and more tools than they used 10 years ago," sd Vinson, the former police department inspector and senior police academy instructor. "One of those tools is the dog."

There are two types of dog sniffs: those using a "passive" method and those using a "dynamic" method. Passive sniffers sit in their car and listen to see if the dog gives off a telltale scent that could mean there is drugs in the car. There are many different types of passive dog sniffs, but most are trned in a very specific manner. A dynamic sniff involves the use of drugs. For example, if the dog is not reliable, he could not be used to search for hidden drugs, but he might be used for a car search.

"We are still using the same type of sniff dog that we had 15 years ago. What has changed is that they are very specific as to how they are trned. They know how to pick up the smell of drugs. All you need is a dog with the skill to detect drugs," sd Joe C. Johnson, a former FBI assistant special agent and canine unit supervisor in Denver. "Just because a dog is trned doesn't mean he is reliable or smart. There are always dumb or untrned dogs in any test. These dogs are trned to detect specific drugs, just like our eyes. They are the same," Johnson added. "We want to make sure we are picking up the most odiferous (odorous) of drugs, the drugs we are after. For example, some dogs are trned to detect marijuana and some are trned to detect cocne."

Because dogs are trned by using odors, Johnson sd, they are "very sensitive to any odors in the car. If the car is smelly, then that could give the dog a big clue to what might be there."

In addition to the dog in the vehicle, another officer looks at the dog's nostrils for signs that he is interested in the particular spot. Another officer also looks in the car's trunk. The "drug dog" in the car might be looking out the window, Johnson sd.

Some officers prefer to use an officer with a dog, Johnson sd.

"I will have a drug dog go up and look in the windows of cars. I will also have a dog walk in the rear window. If I have two officers with dogs, they will walk both of them," he sd.

After the dog enters the car, he or she "tends to have a very aggressive stance. The dog starts to act like a predator -- an aggressor, Johnson sd. If the dog is not trned, he sd, "I will have to make the dog go away from the car. Most of the time the drug dog is aggressive in the presence of drugs. If I have a strong drug dog, he is much less likely to start attacking."

During the car search, other officers can't be distracted, he sd.

"There are some things the dog can smell before the driver does," Johnson sd. "In the trunk, I have a dog that looks to the back seat and can smell in a compartment."

If there are drugs in a car, Johnson sd, the search is still done.

"I may have to let the car sit for a couple of hours while I collect evidence, which then may lead to the arrest. I may bring the car to the station and do the search there."

He cited one case in which a driver "had three large bags of marijuana in the back seat and did not put the bags on the seat."

Johnson and his dog then conducted a search of the trunk, and he saw one of the bags. He asked the driver what the bags contned, and the driver answered they contned clothes. He was arrested.

"The car was so full of people I had to sit on top of it," Johnson sd.

As for searches of the driver's person, "I usually ask for permission, and most of the time it is given. I don't pull anything off."

Johnson, who sd he is not pd, sd the biggest challenge for him is finding a willing officer.

"It is a full-time job," he sd. "You have to do it during your breaks. I have officers that are out on their days off."

A search "is never done on the spot," he sd.

In this case, the search lasted about five hours, during which time at least two officers came back to the scene.

"This is a search warrant," Johnson sd. "When you have one, you have to follow the rules and do the search in a legal manner."

The officer asked the occupants for permission to search their vehicle, but none did so.

Johnson sd he would have to look at the search to determine if the driver's consent was given in writing or verbal.

He sd he never does a search unless the driver has given permission.

"Sometimes you may not be able to give a driver an advisement about the law, and they may not know they need to give consent. Sometimes they may think they need to give consent because if they don't, I can't take the vehicle away from them. I can't cite them


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