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What temperature is too hot for cats


What temperature is too hot for cats?

Question:

My sister told me that my 5 month old kitten will not let her pet him on his

side when she touches it. I have never seen this behavior. He is very loving

with his mom. His nose is in my daughter's arm all the time. When my daughter

cuddles him, his ears are always up. Do cats dislike being touched?

Answer:

Your sister is correct. Cats do not like to be touched. When your sister

touches his side, he will try to push her away. My cat pushes my hand away

from his side as well. He hates being touched, and like to curl up in a ball

when touched. Some cats are really fine with being touched, and some really

don't care for it at all.

It will be difficult for her to pet him if she is holding him, because if

he senses she is trying to grab him, he will react by moving away from her.

When she is holding him, petting him with one hand and holding him with the

other, that is how he is most likely to react. In this case, the most

appropriate thing for her to do is to stop touching him. He does not like to

be held, and being held on the side is not very nice either.

When she pet him in front of him, he may be able to tolerate it, and when she

touches him from the top, he is more likely to like it. In that case, she

would be able to pet him in a position in which he feels comfortable and

happy.

My cat is 5, and I found out that he didn't like being petted on his side

when he was small. He is now at least 4.5 years old. He tolerates petting on

his side if I don't lean over him too much and if I take one hand off. But if

I lean over him to pet him in any position, he moves away from me, and looks

at me with a very disapproving look. I don't know if that's what is making

him angry, or if it is his age.

My cat is a few months old and I have started playing with him. I have seen

this in cats before (I think my mom has one that acted like this too), but

I've never seen this so obviously before! I've tried with him to pet him on

the side, and he flaps his front leg away from me.

I have started petting him from the bottom this way, and he just lays there

and lays there. He's not trying to get away, but he is trying to move away,

which is understandable.

He also gets really uncomfortable if I lean over him while petting him.

Sometimes I can pet him like that for a good amount of time before he looks

at me, at the side of his face, or out at the door, and I'm like, "Do you

want to play, kitty?"

It's really been really weird and I'm scared I'm hurting him or going to

overwhelm him. I want him to know I'm not mad at him, but he's really

uncomfortable if I lean over him while petting him.

How can I get him to like petting him from the bottom?

A:

Most cats would prefer you keep your hands to yourself and pet them from the floor. As a result, the only way to successfully pet your cat from the floor is to be prepared for them to be a bit annoyed or even a bit angry when you start doing it.

Even so, the basic body language that cat's use in the wild is the same that you should use with your cat.

For example, if they are sleeping at a place that is inconvenient for you to be, when you try to pet them, their natural instinct is to push away. A very, very typical way to start a petting session from the floor is to first sit on the floor, then slowly start stroking the cat while in the process moving your whole body closer to their side (and eventually, but not too soon, touching their body).

Once you've gotten past the "push away" stage, the way to approach a cat is to be slow, soft, and gentle. The exact motions you use, however, will vary based on the cat's personality. Even if your cat has an owner who lets them sleep on the floor, cats who are more dominant or used to having their own space or control in the wild would have a very different style of petting from a cat who is comfortable curled up in your lap or resting on your shoulder or one who prefers a more relaxed petting approach.

A:

From my experience, there are three basic styles of petting a cat:

Crouched. The cat lowers their chest to the floor (or other surface) and lifts one of their legs. When you pet them, they allow you to rub under their body (where they feel good). If you try to pet them while they are doing this, they will let you but will be startled and pull away.

Arched. The cat stands with their head and front legs up, and their back legs down. This makes their body appear higher than the ground, and they will feel like they are falling. When you pet them, they will allow you to rub under their chest (where they feel good) but will move away if you try to pet them while they are arched.

Sleeping. The cat is sleeping and cannot feel the ground at all. You can only pet them by rubbing their back or in their stomach. They will not be startled if you try to pet them while they are sleeping.

The first two styles are fairly easy to determine if the cat is arched or crouched. If they are crouched, you can easily pet them. If they are arched, you must be careful not to pet them. They will fall over and you will fall down. It is similar to petting a dog, but even a tiny dog may be startled by a massive cat.

The sleeping style is a little more subtle and will vary depending on the cat. Some like to be petted in the middle of their back, right behind their spine. Others like to be petted in their belly. And some (such as my cat) seem to like to be petted in their forehead.

There are definitely some cat breeds which favor one of these styles more than others. For example, I have a cat that likes to be petted in the belly. My Persian cats are not as comfortable being petted


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