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Let sleeping dogs lie origin


Let sleeping dogs lie originates from the common practice of allowing a stray dog to lie in the yard until someone cared enough to come pick it up. This usually meant that someone would return in the morning to find the dog gone, only to discover that they had been replaced by another stray dog.

There's a reason why we call them "sleeping dogs" and they never wake up.

In the US, a similar phrase is called a "sleeping cat" or "sleeping cow" (although those last two aren't entirely accurate.

One might wonder why it is a metaphor rather than a literal fact that it takes a couple of days for a stray dog to return to his original post (though a stray cat probably would not sleep the entire time), but the answer is that a stray dog will wander off to find food and, if he has a good memory, will return to his previous location after some time has passed.

The metaphor is a common way of talking about someone being "stupid" or "lazy". For instance, it is a common saying in the United States that "A sleeping dog never bites".

When someone who is lazy is described as a "sleeping dog", it is usually with the implication that they are in a deep, dreamless slumber and cannot be woken up by anyone else.

The term originated in reference to a dog, a person, or an animal that seems to be completely unconcerned with any kind of activity, but not necessarily asleep.

Many people think that "sleeping dog" only means that an animal is asleep and unconcerned with the events around it. This is not the case. A sleeping dog can also mean that a person is asleep.

Another example is a sleeping tiger. While some may interpret this as a metaphor for a tiger that is not active at the moment, it is actually a metaphor for a person who is unconcerned with the things going on around them. The image of a tiger is similar to that of a "sleeping dog" because the tiger is usually a predatory animal. The idea is to have the tiger (person) sleep, just like a dog will when someone feeds it or when it is comfortable.

The term is used in a few other ways:

"You're sleeping like a baby." -- This is a metaphor for someone being unusually calm, content, or easy-going.

"Sleeping in." -- Used to describe someone who is tired or sleeping while they are awake.

"Sleeping on it." -- Used to describe someone that is slow to react to something they are told.

"Like a sleeping dog." -- Describes someone who is asleep or unconcerned with what is going on around them, though this metaphor should be understood as it is, a dog will often return to a location once it has left it for a while.

"Sleepwalking." -- Used in this context the term means someone who is sleeping and awake at the same time, as they act like they are still asleep.

"Sleeping with the enemy." -- Used to describe someone who is an enemy.

Sleeping with an enemy, or sleeping with the enemy (as they say in English) is an idiom that implies that one is a trtor by sleeping with the enemy, since sleeping with an enemy could mean that the trtor is sleeping with a different country's army, since the word "enemy" can also refer to the opposite of what one means by the English word "enemy", but it is most often used to refer to sleeping with an individual or group that is perceived as an enemy.

"Sleeping with the enemy" was initially used by the English to describe a trtor that slept with the French during the French and Indian War, and they were called Frenchmen. In the 20th century, the phrase was often used to describe a person who has a romantic relationship with someone that is perceived as an enemy, since most people tend to call themselves "enemies" to their romantic partners, and not "friends".

The phrase also describes the action of the phrase "sleeping with the enemy" when it means sleeping with someone who is not considered an enemy by anyone.

Sleeping with the enemy is similar to the expression, "Sleepwalking", however, "Sleeping with the enemy" does not require the same amount of physical action or thought as "Sleepwalking".

Some people that use the phrase do not think of it in the literal sense, however, they usually say "sleeping with the enemy" in a context where people do sleep with someone who is a threat to their safety, or when they think someone has been trying to do something to harm them.

The phrase is also used to describe a person who is a trtor, since it can be perceived as treason by one country to sleep with the enemy of another.

The phrase is often used by the media in describing political rivals.

"Sleepwalking with the enemy" describes someone who is asleep and awake at the same time.

"Sleepwalking with the enemy" describes someone who is asleep and awake at the same time.

"Sleeping with the enemy" describes someone who is a trtor.

"Sleepwalking with the enemy" describes someone who is asleep and awake at the same time.

"Sleeping with the enemy" describes someone who is asleep and awake at the same time.

Sleeping with an enemy, or sleeping with the enemy (as they say in English) is an idiom that implies that one is a trtor by sleeping with the enemy, since sleeping with an enemy could mean that the trtor is sleeping with a different country's army, since the word "enemy" can also refer to the opposite of what one means by the English word "enemy", but it is most often used to refer to sleeping with an individual or group that is perceived as an enemy.

"Sleeping with the enemy" was initially used by the English to describe a trtor that slept with the French during the French and Indian War, and they were called Frenchmen. In the 20th century, the phrase was often


Watch the video: Pro-pain - let sleeping dogs lie (December 2021).

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