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Whats the prob dog


Whats the prob dog? If you're trying to start something please don't insult people to begin with. You're not a pro, just a newfag trying to get his foot in the door.

Not at all.

"What kind of man would I be if I could only follow my heart where it would take me and not my head. A man is more than one thing, and no more a thing than a man. He is a thing that does its thing, and a thing that makes his way through his day. He is not a thing that does something." - A.E. Douglass

"Not at all. "Not at all" what? "Not at all" what? "Not at all" what?

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheDirtballer

So do you think you have any real knowledge of this subject?

Yes. I spent a lot of time practicing on the computer before going to the range to actually put it to practice. I don't know if I can describe this any better than I already did, but if you could provide an example of you doing what I've seen you describe in this thread, I'll gladly answer it.

Yes. I spent a lot of time practicing on the computer before going to the range to actually put it to practice. I don't know if I can describe this any better than I already did, but if you could provide an example of you doing what I've seen you describe in this thread, I'll gladly answer it.

A lot of my knowledge of reloading has been gained through computer simulation.

In reality, reloading is really only a small portion of reloading. There is so much more to it that I don't believe you really understand what's going on with you are asking for an education on the basics. It has more to do with physics, chemistry, mathematics, optics, machine tools and a bunch of other things. You probably wouldn't really know what you were talking about.

If you have a copy of the book I sent you, the first thing you want to read is the front cover and contents. Inside the book there are several of articles that explain the fundamentals and then other things. There is a whole chapter of computer simulations for reloading and how to simulate it. Most importantly of all is the first part of the Introduction which explains the science behind it all. That chapter has been the key to my success in this subject.

You also asked about cleaning and lubrication. There is a chapter called "Cleaning and Lubrication" that is in the back of the book. The front of the book has some articles that cover it, but the back has an extensive chapter on cleaning and lubrication. I would assume your rifle will be in the same condition that it is in at the factory. Clean it as you would have it in that condition. The best way to clean a rifle is to put it on a cleaning bench with a soft cloth. Start by running it through the bore with steel wool or a brush. After that, if the rifle has any carbon buildup, or just a light buildup that you don't want to ruin a bore, do a quick blow out with compressed air. Just a few seconds or a minute of running through the bore. Take a bore brush to work through it. You will want to take the bore brush and use the back end of it as a scraper for carbon. This is a good article that explains how to do it. The front of the book has another part that has a couple of paragraphs on that.

After that, you can move on to a little bit of lubrication. A good basic lubricant is an oil based lubricant. I find that Teflon based lubricants work best for the inside of the case. The front part of the book has an article on this. You want to choose something that is either the same color or close in color to your rifle's case. Another thing you can do is to take a cotton swab or other cotton material. Wet it with oil and rub it on all the inside of the rifle. I recommend using the inside of the buffer tube or the buffer tube itself as a lubricant. After that, you can either leave it and hope that it is all that it needs, or if there is anything more that needs to be done, or if it looks like it needs to be lubed, you can move on. After that, it's just a matter of trying it out and making sure that the rifle fires all the way through the barrel without the case or part sticking in the barrel. It is an exercise that everyone who shoots regularly should try out.

That's a pretty long question for a short answer, but I hope this helps!

It's actually a pretty easy to do once you know what you are doing.

I have a stock for a 10/22 (which you can get a lot of at places like Academy) and the stock slides in so easily. You would just grab it out of the bag. If you go to a gun store you can have them do the same thing.

Just take your 22 off the safe, unscrew the butt, and slide it into the stock, along with the magazine.

The only problem I ever had was an issue with the magazine, once they were all apart it was super easy to get it back together.

Just be careful with the stock because if you screw it in and then get carried away in the heat of battle and lose your grip, the stock will separate from the weapon...

My uncle does a better job of showing what you need to do. When I bought my first one (it was like 10 years ago, can't remember which one I bought), he just shoved it all together with an Allen key and a set of tweezers. Since that was the only time I've done it, he probably could've used that method for the next 10 years. The rifle came with a new magazine that fits, no matter how old it is.

I did the same thing with the 20 gauge, put all the barrels back on and reassembled it.

I just made sure the barrel was tight to the receiver and was the butt plate locked back down and also added a shell in case it got pushed forward, but after pulling and reassembling the stock, the only two loose screws I found was the fore end and rear sight. Then it was up to me to keep them locked down or not.

I've been able to take apart, clean and reassemble them and have never had to get a gunsmith to do it. I just put them back together.

It might not be as fast as the gunsmith but I'm sure there are parts that can be bought without breaking the bank.

The rifle came with a new magazine that fits, no matter how old it is.

That would be correct for an AR-15 that was not used to break it in for full-auto operation. You might be able to get a new one that will not feed the ammo you currently use, however.

Remember when our nation was a single nation and a family of nations under God.

My uncle does a better job of showing what you need to do. When I bought my first one (it was like 10 years ago, can't remember which one I bought), he just shoved it all together with an Allen key and a set of tweezers. Since that was the only time I've done it, he probably could've used that method for the next 10 years. The rifle came with a new magazine that


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