Information

Cathedral dog and cat hospital


Cathedral dog and cat hospital of New York

Cathedral dog and cat hospital of New York is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) non-medical animal hospital in Manhattan, New York City. Founded in 1975 by New York City veterinarian Dr. David E. Jones, CCHNY is one of only a few free-admission veterinary hospitals in the city. As of 2012, the hospital has approximately 90,000 animals in its care per year. In 2010, the hospital was recognized as one of the 50 Most Popular Hospitals in America by Petfinder.com. The hospital's mission is to "provide free or low-cost veterinary care for all dogs and cats in NYC."

History

Foundation and early years (1975–1979)

Cathedral dog and cat hospital of New York was founded in 1975 by Dr. David E. Jones, who at the time was a resident of New York City and was practicing small animal surgery at the Animal Medical Center in Brooklyn. The hospital began on the third floor of a brownstone on West End Avenue, near 76th Street, in the West Village of Manhattan.

Dr. Jones was inspired to open the hospital after reading about Dr. John Neihaus's work with animals at the Animal Medical Center of New York (AMCNY). Dr. Neihaus, a veterinarian from Westchester County, New York, had a practice that catered to cats, dogs, birds, small animals and farm animals, and he was the only veterinarian in the county who cared for horses. At the time, there were only about 50 veterinarians in the city, but according to Dr. Jones, there was no hospital that provided care for cats and dogs, and "in most cases, cats and dogs had to wait in long lines to see a veterinarian."

In the first year, the hospital was open only seven days a week from 9 am to 5 pm. During its first year, the hospital took in $10,000. During its second year, it was operating under a grant from the ASPCA.

The hospital expanded its hours to open on weekends in 1976, adding a Saturday and Sunday afternoon clinic. The following year, Dr. Jones expanded the hospital to include a cat wing. That same year, the hospital began accepting referrals from pet stores. That same year, the hospital added an outdoor clinic on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. That same year, the hospital began referring pet owners to an animal rescue called Manhattan Feral Cat Society (MFCS) and the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS).

Expansion and growth (1980–1989)

By 1980, the hospital was open Monday through Friday from 9 am to 5 pm and on Saturdays from 9 am to noon. The hospital was also open on Sundays from 9 am to 5 pm.

In 1982, the hospital expanded its clinic hours to include evenings and weekends. It began referring dogs and cats to other hospitals and shelters when it was closed to walk-ins, and that year the hospital began accepting referrals from animal hospitals in Connecticut, and added a free clinic for cats and dogs that was open evenings and weekends.

The following year, the hospital began receiving referrals from other local animal hospitals and veterinary schools, and added an on-call veterinarian for emergencies. In 1984, the hospital started accepting referrals from all over the tri-state area. Also in that year, the hospital began accepting referrals from other New York City veterinary schools.

In 1985, the hospital began accepting referrals from veterinary schools and clinics in New Jersey, and began receiving referrals from other New York City animal shelters. In the same year, the hospital began accepting referrals from the Metropolitan Humane Society, and began operating a free-admission clinic for dogs and cats on Sundays from 12 to 4 pm. Also in 1985, the hospital started accepting referrals from the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA). In 1987, the hospital began receiving referrals from animal shelters in northern New Jersey, and in 1988, began operating a Saturday afternoon clinic in northern New Jersey.

By 1989, the hospital had expanded to nine veterinarians on staff. That same year, the hospital expanded to include a free clinic for dogs and cats on Saturdays and Sundays from 10 am to 2 pm. That same year, the hospital added a staff of animal-behavior consultants, and began accepting referrals from the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA).

1990s

The hospital's staff grew to 12 veterinarians in 1991. That same year, the hospital expanded to include a free clinic for cats and dogs on Mondays from 10 am to 2 pm. That same year, the hospital expanded to include a free clinic for cats and dogs on Saturdays and Sundays from 10 am to 2 pm, and opened a free clinic for horses. That same year, the hospital expanded to include a free clinic for cats and dogs on Saturdays and Sundays from 9 am to noon. That same year, the hospital's staff increased to 15, and the hospital's emergency-care service was expanded to 24/7 service.

The hospital's staff increased to 16 veterinarians in 1992, and in the same year, the hospital expanded to include a free clinic for cats and dogs on Saturdays and Sundays from 9 am to 12 noon, and opened a free clinic for horses on weekends from 10 am to 2 pm. In 1993, the hospital's staff increased to 20, and in 1994, the hospital's emergency-care service was expanded to 24/7 service.

The hospital's staff increased to 23 veterinarians in 1995, and in the same year, the hospital's emergency-care service was expanded to 24/7 service.

The hospital's staff increased to 25 veterinarians in 1996, and that year, the hospital opened a free clinic for cats and dogs on Sundays from 10 am to noon, and added a free clinic for cats and dogs on Fridays from 10 am to noon.

By 1997, the hospital's staff had grown to 26 veterinarians, and the hospital's emergency-care service was expanded to 24/7 service. That year, the


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