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Dwarf ram rabbit: peculiarities of the breed


The dwarf ram rabbits are a breed with floppy ears and represent the smallest representatives of the ram rabbits. They are considered to be robust in terms of health and relatively trusting. You can find out more about the cute nutty noses below. Dwarf rams are the smallest representatives among the rabbit breeds with floppy ears - Shutterstock / Dagmar Hijmans

The first thing you notice about dwarf rams is their long, drooping ears. They are characteristic of the ram breed, which owes its name to the visual resemblance to a horned ram.

Dwarf ram rabbit: how the breed came about

In Germany, the dwarf ram rabbit has been recognized as an independent breed since 1973, but was then still known under the name "Aries dwarf". Since 2003, the little fluffy earmuffs have been officially called dwarf rams. However, the fur noses originally come from the Netherlands, where they have been bred since 1952. A certain Adrian de Cock mated a color dwarf with a French ram and the offspring in turn with an English ram, so that a dwarf rabbit with floppy ears came out.

In terms of appearance, dwarf rams are quite compact and rounded: the physique is short and compact, with broad shoulders and short, powerful legs. Her face is chubby, with a short muzzle and a wide forehead. The base of her floppy ears sits close to the middle of the head, so that a small fur crown is created between the spoons. By the way: When the miniature ram rabbits are born, their spoons are still upright - only at the age of four to six weeks does gravity gain the upper hand over one ear, then over the other.

In the video you can see the cute mummelschnuten in full action as they bounce around happily in their outdoor enclosure:

Dwarf Aries: Popular domestic rabbits with floppy ears

Character features?

The dwarf ram rabbits are said to be good-natured, friendly and trusting. When kept appropriately, the loving, gentle nature of the floppy earbearer can develop best. Nevertheless, it is important that you treat the little animals carefully and patiently if you want them to be tame and maybe learn a trick or two. Rabbits, on the other hand, who feel threatened or insecure, can react quite defensively and then have little desire to make contact with humans.

Keeping dwarf rams rabbits: tips

In principle, the same applies to the keeping of dwarf rams as for other rabbit breeds. Under no circumstances should they be kept alone, they always need at least one rabbit friend at their side - guinea pigs or other small animals cannot replace their peers because they have completely different habits and types of communication. In addition to a spacious cage, lots of fresh hay, fresh water and green fodder, Mümmler need exercise every day - preferably in the garden. But the lively fur pompoms can also let off steam over hours of play in a rabbit-proof room in your apartment.

Speaking of fur: the soft, fluffy fur of the dwarf rams is very easy to care for. In addition, the Mümmler clean themselves and each other, so that they only need a little human support when the fur is changed. With a soft natural hair brush, you can carefully and gently remove the excess hair.


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