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What does it mean when a cat headbutts you

What does it mean when a cat headbutts you


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What does it mean when a cat headbutts you?

I've been playing with kittens for the past couple of years, and I'd been meaning to get a cat for some time. I finally decided to pick one up a couple of weeks ago and I fell in love with one in particular. Unfortunately, the day before I planned on picking her up, I went to an outdoor concert, and I didn't bring her. I went on a hike, and when I got back, she was still home. I'm not exactly sure how she ended up getting away, but she did. So I decided to stay home the following day and see if she would come to me. I left the bedroom door open, put some food on a table, and waited. After a couple of hours, she finally came over and I was shocked to see she had a black eye and her eye seemed kind of swollen. I got her inside, took a picture of her, and then took her to the vet.

The doctor told me she had a mild concussion and a bit of a concussion. She also said to let her be and I guess it will heal itself. She gave me some medication to help with the swelling, and she also gave me some pain medicine.

I was really upset when I took her to the vet, but she was fine for the most part. I was a little bit worried when I went back home because I didn't know if she had any other injuries.

Does anyone know how a cat headbutts you? I want to know exactly how it works so I know what kind of precautions I need to take. The reason I ask is because last week I was taking her for a walk and she headbutted me on the head. Luckily, I still have a piece of my ear, but I still wanted to know the best way to protect myself and her. I've seen some videos online of people getting injured when a cat headbutts you. Does anyone know how a cat headbutts you? I want to know exactly how it works so I know what kind of precautions I need to take. The reason I ask is because last week I was taking her for a walk and she headbutted me on the head. Luckily, I still have a piece of my ear, but I still wanted to know the best way to protect myself and her.

A:

They may give an injury "bump," but a concussion does not require any physical evidence of injury. In general, injuries that show up on x-ray or an MRI scan show evidence of injury. Other injuries require a doctor to observe your cat's symptoms or observe signs of injury.

If the vet is concerned, you will be able to tell her about the injury, but she won't be able to do anything about it unless you give her an order to do so.

The cat may start licking or licking at the ear, and you will want to keep her clean. If she's worried about it, she may bite or scratch, but she may have been doing this before the headbutt. She may start walking around and not wanting to settle down for a nap or playtime, that can be a sign of anxiety, not of concussion.

A:

Concussions are very serious. If the cat has a concussion, you should not let it play, and you should immediately get her to the vet.

Concussions cause the brain to swell. The symptoms are dizziness, headache, lack of coordination, confusion and problems with the balance. If the concussion is a result of the head butting, I'm not aware of any known recovery time between headbashing and when the concussion shows up. If you want to know more you need to speak with a doctor about it.

A:

I think this would probably get diagnosed as a simple head injury. That's a concussion, which is a swelling of the brain. If the dog gets out of control and headbutts your arm, I'd think he'd have a simple injury.

It doesn't sound like the vet's concerned about the injury, he just has the owner to order around. So your dog is probably fine. It could be he has a high pain threshold, and feels that a mild head injury isn't a big deal.

A:

I think the most appropriate answer to your question is here: https://www.pets.ca/concussion-injury-treatment-concussion-care.html#.Xrp1KJQ7GdU

Concussions can also happen because of brain shear stress.

The brain is a tough organ. It has an uncanny ability to try and

recover from injury. There is still a lot we don't know about how the

brain responds to injury, but a few things are clear. First, you need

time. The brain doesn’t have pain receptors, so your pet may not

consciously feel the concussion. If he is lethargic, does not respond to

your voice, or falls over, that is a sign that something is wrong. Be

sure to get him to a vet right away. If left alone, your pet could

suffer serious health consequences.

A:

No. This is something your vet will have to decide. I think as the owner you would be concerned. I wouldn't be.

If you're worried, call your vet, or a friend or neighbor, and ask them what their personal opinion is. Your local vet's can usually recommend where to go to get a better answer.

You can take an x-ray, and your vet can tell you what it means, what's happened, etc.

As for if your pet is alright, that's another issue, but it's hard to tell if you're asking the right questions. If your dog is doing ok now, it's possible that he's suffered no harm, or only a temporary injury.


Watch the video: Cat Headbutt (May 2022).

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